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Saftey First


LongHairBri
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figured we needed a thread about saftey. there are many possible hazards in and around a grow room. electricity and water make a potential deadly situation in ANY grow op.

 

well, let's get the ball rolling: I had a major timer meltdown last night. went to inspect after I got home lastnight, all was well. 2 hours later I went down again for something a light was out. here's why!

IMG_20111203_085753.jpg

 

IMG_20111203_085722.jpg

 

let's just say, I'm NOT happy. I'm replacing all my light timers today with commercial grade and changing the wires and circut breakers to match. we can't be having these types of problems again

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I like to use this timer. This one is typically used for a hot water heater. It's mechanical and they last forever. They do have to be reset after a power failure though. Being intended for a hot water heater it is rated for 40 amps, well above the 20 amp circuits that are used for lighting, and will control a 220 load. I wired mine in to directly control hardwired 220 receptacles.

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I had that timer also. Tho it never melted like that, it did stop working for no apparent reason. I just installed a Titan Helios 3 lighting controller a couple weeks ago. It controls all 4 of my bloom lights in one convenient little package. No more trying to sync 4 seperate timers!! Sorry about your meltdown!! Medcnman.

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If he's running a 1000 watt light on that timer it's plenty of load to cause that. But it really isn't the load that is the cause. Even a small load with a bad connection can create a lot of heat. Over time the connection between the plug of the ballast and the timer probably began to arc a little. And it's probably been going on for a while now. This caused excess heat and resulted in the picture above. He most likely never saw the beginning signs of it over heating.

 

Out of curiosity what is the voltage and amperage rating on that timer?

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I have to ask, digital or buzzer ballast??? Most digitals won't draw enough to do this.. and if its a buzzer id say u have a ballast issue. Be carefull something had to change to do this. A bigger timer is not the answer..

good call. I will be getting a couple spare ballasts today, just in case

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good call. I will be getting a couple spare ballasts today, just in case

 

 

a simple amperage test would tell u if u have a issue. "load test" load test video

 

 

my htg digital starts up at 8.2 amps. works up to 11.8 then drops back to 6.9 when warm.

 

 

ole school buzzer types can have the insulation material degrade over time and alow the coil to internally short out, but it will still work just draw a crap ton more amps..

Edited by Green-Nubie
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I like to use this timer. This one is typically used for a hot water heater. It's mechanical and they last forever. They do have to be reset after a power failure though. Being intended for a hot water heater it is rated for 40 amps, well above the 20 amp circuits that are used for lighting, and will control a 220 load. I wired mine in to directly control hardwired 220 receptacles.

 

this is what i did and it works great

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all is well now. installed a Helios 11 lighting controller. 30amp per leg 240v on 10/2 wire. nice and neat. controls 4X1000w 240 ballasts

 

titan%20helios%2011.jpg?

comes with a 15' jumper plug. you plug into any standard timer. when the timer goes on, the lights follow.

another great feature. I can insall a delay module on the timer and prevent hot starts if the power flickers. a lot better than buying one for each ballast! not to mention the timer is replacable

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Not much safer than what you had. A 30 amp lighting circuit is not permitted in a home. And in a commercial or industrial environment that light fixture would have to have a heavy-duty lampholder as well as be rated for installation on a 30-ampere circuit.

 

NEC Article 210.23 (B) 30-Ampere Branch Circuits

A 30-ampere branch circuit shall be permitted to supply fixed lighting units with heavy-duty lampholders in other than a dwelling unit(s) or utilization equipment in any occupancy. A rating of any one cord-and-plug-connected utilization equipment shall not exceed 80 percent of the branch-circuit ampere rating.

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Can you guys make a recommendation on power strips and extension cords? Is a 15 amp rating the only thing to look for? Thx. Good thread.

Power strips for the most part are junk unless you spend big bucks. Most are rated for 15 amps. Remember you can only operate a circuit at 80 percent of the circuit rated capacity. The circuit breaker is designed to trip at 80 % continuos load which is 12 amps or 1440 watts. Much preferred Twenty amp receptacles and 12 gage wire are commonly used. You can make a quality power source box by buying 20 amp receptacles and installing them in metal junction boxes. The box the can be wired with a pig tail ( made to length you want) then you are able to plug into another receptacle location or can be hard wired direct. With that said, I would recommend more perminent installation of power to your equipment. Flexible extension cords should not be used in place of perminent wiring NEC 400.8

Edited by orion
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