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Conrad
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I just noticed a few spider mites under the leaves of my mm(sad ,I know). I recently used azamax as a soil drench (preventative! go figure) and 2 days later they are on the underside of leaves. Were they in the soil and went to safer ground? or a friend(whos weed is notorious for spider mites) stopped by a few days prior,but didnt even go in my room...Im freaking out a bit. I use azamax and neem as prevents and still get mites. Anyone use the bombs before?Ive heard of the success with the bombs ,but never had to use before.Any suggestions will be considered.Help I cant sleep! Thank You

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Ah, mites..... not likely the Azamax "freaked them out" of the soil. This "friend" of yours is highly suspect. Dirty friends can often harbor the unwanted mites into your protected space. Here is a bit of info from the Ohio State Univ. website...

 

"Control Strategies

 

Early detection of spider mites, before damage is noticed, is important. The tiny spider mites can be detected by taking a piece of white paper or cardboard and striking some plant foliage on it. The mites can be seen walking slowly on the paper. If 10 or more mites per sample are common, controls may be needed.

 

Option 1: Cultural Control - Syringing Since rainy weather seems to knock off spider mites, using a forceful jet of water from a hose (syringing) can perform the same task. A regular syringing can keep spider mites under control on most ornamental plants in the landscape. This technique also helps conserve natural predators.

 

Option 2: Cultural Control - Quarantine and Inspection The twospotted spider mite is often introduced on infested bedding and house plants. When purchasing new plants, carefully inspect the lower leaf surface for any signs of mite activity. New house plants should be quarantined from other plants until you are sure that no mites are present.

 

Option 3: Biological Control - Predators There are numerous insects (lacewings and lady beetles) that prey on spider mites. However, the most commonly sold predators are other types of mites. Predatory mites (usually Phytoseiulus spp., Amblyseius spp. or Metaseiulus spp.) can be purchased and released onto infested plants. Be sure to check listings to determine which species is appropriate. Some species are host specific and each predator works better under different weather conditions. If predators are used, do not apply pesticides that will kill them.

 

Option 4: Chemical Control - "Soft Pesticides" Most spider mites can be controlled with insecticidal oils and soaps. The oils, both horticultural oil and dormant oil, can be used. Horticultural oils can be used on perennial and woody ornamentals during the summer at the 1 to 2 percent rate. Higher rates of horticultural oil (3 to 4 percent) or dormant oil are useful for killing mite eggs and dormant adults in the fall and spring. The insecticidal soaps are useful in the warm season. Remember that mites are very tiny and soaps and oils work by contact only. Therefore, thorough coverage of the plant is necessary for good control.

 

Option 5: Chemical Control - Miticides Spider mites are usually not killed by regular insecticides, so be sure to check the pesticide label to see if "miticide" is present. Pesticides claiming "for mite suppression" are usually weak miticides and will not perform well. There are few products available to the homeowner. Dicofol (=Kelthane) is registered for over-the-counter use but is difficult to find. Acephate (=Orthene), dimethoate (=Cygon), chlorpyrifos (=Dursban), diazinon, disulfoton (=Di-syston), and malathion have over-the-counter product labels but are considered weak miticides.

 

Avermectin (=Avid), bifenthrin (=Talstar), dienochlor (=Pentac), fenbutatin-oxide (=Vendex), fluvalinate (=Mavrik), oxamyl (=Vydate), oxydemeton-methyl (Metasystox-R), oxythioquinox (Morestan), and propargite (=Omite) are restricted use pesticides available only to licensed applicators."

 

Hope this helps.

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I just noticed a few spider mites under the leaves of my mm(sad ,I know). I recently used azamax as a soil drench (preventative! go figure) and 2 days later they are on the underside of leaves. Were they in the soil and went to safer ground? or a friend(whos weed is notorious for spider mites) stopped by a few days prior,but didnt even go in my room...Im freaking out a bit. I use azamax and neem as prevents and still get mites. Anyone use the bombs before?Ive heard of the success with the bombs ,but never had to use before.Any suggestions will be considered.Help I cant sleep! Thank You

Spider mites are everywhere in the summer months. If you spray Azamax early at the base of your plants and repeat it every week even if you can't find any with your magnifying glass! Dirt growers have more issues than hydroponics as it is cleaner and less avenues for bugs. Just close your room up tight everynight after spraying the undersides of the bottom leaves where they start. I also use HotShot which sits in my room in the corner. It keeps the room free of all bugs. Can't wait till the dirt season is over?

Peace and Love and Just Imagine.

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I have switched over to hot shot strips. Much easier than weekly solutions for me with my busy schedule. I have found three to four days in my grow room will do the trick then I put it in a ziplock until I see and signs of reinfestation. Have a MM guru who swears by this method.

 

Dizz

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Alternate between Floramite and Forbid. Only use either product twice before switching to the other. Eggs hatch between 3-5 days, so the second spraying should occur then. Once you mix Floramite, it starts breaking down very quickly.

Floramite. Are you serious. I checked this out on line a couple weeks ago because someone emaile me and said he had an organic way to kill them.. It is for ortimentals. Not for food products. it stays on your plant for 28 days. Stay away from this it is not for food. Unless you can show a floramite that is for food. Spider mites are no big deal. people freak out. Main thing is to stay on top of your game. I just found some last week. What i use is a food quaility spray that contains ONLY pyrathanes. It is at most garden centers. It also says on the label can be used up to the day of harvest. I feel a lot safer using this than other sprays. As for just using hot shots, if your room is vented well with fresh air the hot shots wont work. I do hang them in my rooms though. Also these sprays kill on contact, so after spraying I wait 30 min than rinse all the spray off, this is why I dont use something with neem oil in it. If you have question feel free to pm me. Because even 1 mite can lead to an infestation. Repeat in 5 days.

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spectracide and azamax.... spray spectracide the first week and follow up with another treatment 4-7 days later... after that it should be controlled enough for azamax to do its job the drench azamax clearly states that it is for soil issues not mites.. u have to foliar spray azamax to help with mites.. once a week should do this will control mites.. they wont lay eggs where azamax is present and it messes with reproduction system leaving them kinda sterile..

 

my 2 cents

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Floramite is used on agriculture crops outdoors. I would not dare use it on flowering plants but for preventative maintenance on mothers and clones its one of the best ways to knock down mites.

 

I use it along with SM-90 as a wetting agent and have never had any issues with mites on my flowering plants (knock on wood)

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i had mites when i was growing in dirt, since then i use safers soap,as directed,durning the veg.cycle,nothing in the flowering.i've been doing this for months and have never had a problem again.i'd stop using it but i just don't want to go through the hassle of an out break again.i think the trick is preventive treatments.good luck..zb

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Ah, mites..... not likely the Azamax "freaked them out" of the soil. This "friend" of yours is highly suspect. Dirty friends can often harbor the unwanted mites into your protected space. Here is a bit of info from the Ohio State Univ. website...

 

"Control Strategies

 

Early detection of spider mites, before damage is noticed, is important. The tiny spider mites can be detected by taking a piece of white paper or cardboard and striking some plant foliage on it. The mites can be seen walking slowly on the paper. If 10 or more mites per sample are common, controls may be needed.

 

Option 1: Cultural Control - Syringing Since rainy weather seems to knock off spider mites, using a forceful jet of water from a hose (syringing) can perform the same task. A regular syringing can keep spider mites under control on most ornamental plants in the landscape. This technique also helps conserve natural predators.

 

Option 2: Cultural Control - Quarantine and Inspection The twospotted spider mite is often introduced on infested bedding and house plants. When purchasing new plants, carefully inspect the lower leaf surface for any signs of mite activity. New house plants should be quarantined from other plants until you are sure that no mites are present.

 

Option 3: Biological Control - Predators There are numerous insects (lacewings and lady beetles) that prey on spider mites. However, the most commonly sold predators are other types of mites. Predatory mites (usually Phytoseiulus spp., Amblyseius spp. or Metaseiulus spp.) can be purchased and released onto infested plants. Be sure to check listings to determine which species is appropriate. Some species are host specific and each predator works better under different weather conditions. If predators are used, do not apply pesticides that will kill them.

 

Option 4: Chemical Control - "Soft Pesticides" Most spider mites can be controlled with insecticidal oils and soaps. The oils, both horticultural oil and dormant oil, can be used. Horticultural oils can be used on perennial and woody ornamentals during the summer at the 1 to 2 percent rate. Higher rates of horticultural oil (3 to 4 percent) or dormant oil are useful for killing mite eggs and dormant adults in the fall and spring. The insecticidal soaps are useful in the warm season. Remember that mites are very tiny and soaps and oils work by contact only. Therefore, thorough coverage of the plant is necessary for good control.

 

Option 5: Chemical Control - Miticides Spider mites are usually not killed by regular insecticides, so be sure to check the pesticide label to see if "miticide" is present. Pesticides claiming "for mite suppression" are usually weak miticides and will not perform well. There are few products available to the homeowner. Dicofol (=Kelthane) is registered for over-the-counter use but is difficult to find. Acephate (=Orthene), dimethoate (=Cygon), chlorpyrifos (=Dursban), diazinon, disulfoton (=Di-syston), and malathion have over-the-counter product labels but are considered weak miticides.

 

Avermectin (=Avid), bifenthrin (=Talstar), dienochlor (=Pentac), fenbutatin-oxide (=Vendex), fluvalinate (=Mavrik), oxamyl (=Vydate), oxydemeton-methyl (Metasystox-R), oxythioquinox (Morestan), and propargite (=Omite) are restricted use pesticides available only to licensed applicators."

 

Hope this helps.

good info but the mite predetors dont work tryed them my self (http://www.arbico-organics.com/product/mite-predator-neoseiulus-californicus) paid 53 for 1000

 

 

next rember that you or your patient will be smoking what ever you spray on or around your plant so use some thing O.M.R.I listed and even then id only use in the veg stage so it breaks down before the bud is done

 

 

and most of all watch your clones with a microscope before u even bring them home

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we're lucky we don't have super mites in michigan-

 

yet. this formula works good. it dissolves mites and eggs. it is alkaline so a rinsing is required. this treatment is best for vegging plants and clones.

 

1/4 cup Baking Soda

1/2 cup Apple Cider vinegar

1 Tablespoon Lemon Juice

2 drops dish detergent

1/4 Teaspoon Epsom Salts

 

Take a cup of very hot water and desolve the epsom salts,take rest of ingredients and place in a clean 2 liter bottle and let work out. Add epsom solution. Add water to fill to 48ozs(3/4 full).Shake well.

 

TO USE: Cover soil/medium with plastic,with lights off mist plant all over,especialy under leaves,

Wait 20 mins,then spritz off with clean fresh water shaking as much water off plant as you can.

The fresh water spritz rinse will remove the solution along with the desolved remains of the mites and their eggs.

 

treating clones and vegging plants with this mix are guaranteed to kill the borg.

 

during flower i use a tobacco tea with alcohol, canola oil, garlic, and cinnamon. it takes about two weeks to totally dissipate, although within a day or two mostly goes away. it won't ruin buds unless you are having humidity and temp issues anyway.

 

oops. have to look around for that recipe. i'll put it up later.

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ok-

also for the above recipe i will mix the same amount of ingredients to a gallon instead of a two litre for tender or stressed plants. it has been known to burn some, especially if not washed of thoroughly before putting back to the lights. also this is the spray i use all around the floor, walls, pots, whatever. without rinsing of course.

 

i also forgot to mention that canola oil works similar to neem oil. search around for it.

 

also i use "hot shot" brand no pest strips. you hang them in the room and they emit a vapor that kills bugs. it doesn't say mites on the package, but lots of guys swear by 'em, and i don't ahve mites. they say they are good for use in spots inhabited four hours or less per day. because they release vapor if eel they are safe for the bud as a good airing out (drying) should eliminate any vapor inside the flower.

 

this is my flower formula:

 

3.8g tobacco( i use the "roll your own" kind as it's additive free. marlboro's definitely have poisons of various forms sprayed all over 'em.)

8 oz alcohol (half a normal sized bottle)

5ml natural soap (i use palmolive)

78ml/aaprx 5.25 tbs canola oil

1 tsp garlic powder(crushed garlic works better, i ahve used powder plenty)

1 tsp cinnamon (again fresh works best)

1 gallon water

1 strainer

 

mix tobacco into the water and boil for a few minutes to kill any pathogens, stir. let cool. strain the tobacco water and add the rest of the ingredients. spray on plants paying particular attention to the undersides of the leaves. shake regularly to keep oil suspended in the mix. a pump up sprayer works best, they are available at family dollar for five or six bucks.

 

i ahve used this formula on flowering plants as late as 6 weeks. after a thorough spray, approaching a drench, all mites dead in a day. i have never had to reapply, once is enough. remember i also use the no pest strips. i'm sure they work in conjunction.

treated plants are indistinguishable. noone ever knows the difference(maybe the occasional pot snob). and the oil gives the plants a glow that looks great in the room.

 

the smell from this dissipates quickly, leaving just a faint garlic/ cinnamon smell that is kinda pleasant, and fades to popcorn smell at a week, to nothing at two weeks.

 

hope this helps. it took a considerable amount of r&d to arrive at these formulas. they work well for me, are all natural, and easily made.

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we're lucky we don't have super mites in michigan-

 

yet. this formula works good. it dissolves mites and eggs. it is alkaline so a rinsing is required. this treatment is best for vegging plants and clones.

 

 

 

treating clones and vegging plants with this mix are guaranteed to kill the borg.

 

during flower i use a tobacco tea with alcohol, canola oil, garlic, and cinnamon. it takes about two weeks to totally dissipate, although within a day or two mostly goes away. it won't ruin buds unless you are having humidity and temp issues anyway.

 

oops. have to look around for that recipe. i'll put it up later.

 

where did u get the silly idea spider mites were not in michigan? that was a joke right?

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we're lucky we don't have super mites in michigan-

 

yet. this formula works good. it dissolves mites and eggs. it is alkaline so a rinsing is required. this treatment is best for vegging plants and clones.

 

 

 

treating clones and vegging plants with this mix are guaranteed to kill the borg.

 

during flower i use a tobacco tea with alcohol, canola oil, garlic, and cinnamon. it takes about two weeks to totally dissipate, although within a day or two mostly goes away. it won't ruin buds unless you are having humidity and temp issues anyway.

 

oops. have to look around for that recipe. i'll put it up later.

 

 

This seems like a good approach from an organic perspective

just an added note

Vinegar and Baking Soda make a pretty explosive mix so MIX CAREFULLY

in fact the Anarchist Cookbook has a pretty deadly device based on V/BS

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answer above

 

I have not been able to seal my room yet and some critters flew in the other day. Interestingly, they only landed on my Kushberry mother. I have two Sour Diesel mothers and some clones as well as 2 diesel ryder auto in the first month and the borg IGNORED all the diesel genetics to infest my Kushberry only. I mean I have looked and cannot even find a bite mark on any diesel plants!!! hmmm

I just isolated the one and neemed her down a few times out of the light and went into my box to clean and I cannot find any evidence of their existence anywhere else....

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Ed Rosenthal's Zero Tolerance eliminates plant pests. This herbal Pesticide-Fungicide is made from the highest quality oils of cinnamon, clove, rosemary and thyme.

 

Zero Tolerance can be applied up to 5 days before harvest.

 

http://www.4hydro.com/growroom/zeroTolerance.asp

 

 

Safer Insecticidal Soap is an organic insecticide

http://www.4hydro.com/growroom/safer.asp

 

Safer soap sprayed as preventative in vegatative every 3 days

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