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Can Medical Marijuana Be Used To Treat Bipolar Disorder?


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A recent study conducted in Glen Oaks hospital in New York, showed that marijuana could have a beneficial effect on neurocognitive functions of patients with bipolar disorder. The study was performed on 200 BD patients, 50 of whom have been smoking marijuana. All of them underwent tests that tested their neurocognitive functions (attention span, speed shifting, digits forward and backward tests and trails B test). The results were intriguing to say the least.

 

Cannabis Use Disorder

 

However, before we present you with the study’s conclusions, you have to bear in mind that the medical world is full of disorders, some being completely justified and others just being labeled as illnesses for the hell of it. In line with that practice, a frequent marijuana smoker ‘suffers’ from CUD (Cannabis Use Disorder) and is more likely to suffer from a history of psychosis than a person who doesn’t smoke. At least, that’s what the research suggests. Simply put, a BD patient with CUD is only 14% more likely to have a history of psychosis than a BD patient who doesn’t smoke marijuana.

 

Results

 

It was concluded that BD patients with CUD had significantly better cognitive tests results than patients who didn’t ‘suffer’ from CUD. That fact alone will significantly motivate further medical marijuana related research because now we can move away from the ‘burnout’ dogma and focus on the actual health benefits of cannabis. We always believed that you shouldn’t became a slave to the plant, but consume it moderately in order to reap the rewards it can provide and utilize its maximum potential.

 

Supporting Studies

 

To support this research, we found a study that was published in the American Journal of Epidemiology in August, 2011. The study revealed that middle-aged men could benefit from the use of marijuana as well. Apparently, cannabis can significantly improve their mental stamina. They are able to think more clearly, a benefit that was practically never associated with the use of marijuana. The study was conducted on 8,992 male drug users. The first phase of research was conducted when they were 42, and the second when they turned 50. Basically, much was gained in terms of mental clarity, yet nothing was actually lost for good.

 

Conclusion

 

According to these two studies, it is safe to conclude that the use of medical marijuana is actually beneficial to both patients who suffer from bipolar disorder and middle-aged men. In addition, there seem to be no permanent psychological consequences of frequent marijuana use (at least in the time span of 10 years) with middle-aged men. This actually makes sense because recent research actually proves that the brain is not fully developed until you reach your late 30?s or early 40?s even. So, even you don’t toke in the first 20 years, don’t worry – there’ll be plenty of time to enjoy it afterwards.

 

Some people who have Biploar feel that marijuana works in terms of dealing with their bipolar. Most feel sativa strains are more helpful for treating Bipolar. However it can depend on which mood you are feeling so at certain times an indica strain may be beneficial.

 

http://www.theweedbl...polar-disorder/

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How about a true life experience. I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder over 20 years ago. It turns out that I have been self medicating for a very long time as I'm very sure that I have been wired wrong all my life!

 

It worked wonders for me, you might even say that it saved my life and still gives me a reason to live. I actually allows me to enjoy life! Yet, so many think that this is nothing more than a bunch of hippies getting high. They need to take a walk in my shoes.

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Although I believe that mmj esp high CBD varieties can be beneficial for bi polar disorder I feel that proper references in this post were lacking due to the fact that they were not present in the original article. A link to the original study is important.

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Cannabis use linked to cognitive performance in bipolar patients

By Mark Cowen

20 July 2012

Psychiatry Res
2012; Advance online publication

MedWire News
: Results from a US study suggest that bipolar I disorder (BD I) patients with a history of cannabis use have better neurocognitive function than those who have not used cannabis.

The team found that BD I patients with cannabis use disorder (CUD) performed better on measures of attention, processing speed, and working memory than other BD I patients, despite being more likely to have a history of psychosis, indicating a more severe disease course.

"These data could be interpreted to suggest that cannabis use may have a beneficial effect on cognitive functioning in patients with severe psychiatric disorders," comment Raphael Braga (The Zucker Hillside Hospital, Glen Oaks, New York) and team.

"However, it is also possible that these findings may be due to the requirement for a certain level of cognitive function and related social skills in the acquisition of illicit drugs."

The results come from a study of 200 BD I patients, of whom 50 had CUD.

All of the participants underwent clinical assessments and completed a neurocognitive test battery.

There were no significant differences between patients with and without CUD regarding age, racial background, or highest education level achieved, the researchers note in
Psychiatry Research
.

However, patients with CUD were more likely to have a history of psychosis than those without, at 82.0% versus 67.3%.

Nevertheless, patients with CUD had significantly better attention, processing speed/set-shifting, and working memory than those without, as indicated by scores on the Digits forward test (7.00 vs 6.25), the Trails B test (93.32 vs 120.77 seconds), and the Digits Backward test (4.93 vs 4.23), respectively.

Braga and team conclude: "These analyses indicate an interesting pattern suggesting superior neurocognitive performance among bipolar patients with comorbid CUD when compared to bipolar patients without a history of cannabis use.

"Moreover, this cognitive advantage is noted in spite of evidence of a more severe clinical course."

They add: "We hope that the results from our study will help guide and encourage future large studies and help further elucidate the multifaceted associations and possible impact of cannabis use in bipolar disorder."

MedWire (www.medwire-news.md) is an independent clinical news service provided by Springer Healthcare Limited. © Springer Healthcare Ltd; 2012

 

 

and

 

 

 

Abstract

Studies investigating the impact of cannabis use on bipolar clinical characteristics and neurocognition are limited. The objective of the present study was to compare clinical and neurocognitive measures in individuals with bipolar disorder with a history of cannabis use disorder (CUD) versus those without a history of CUD. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a large cohort (
N
=200) of bipolar I subjects, either with (CUD+;
N
=50) or without (CUD−;
N
=150) a history of CUD. We compared the groups on clinical and demographic variables, as well as on performance on neurocognitive tests. Patient groups did not differ regarding age, age of onset or global assessment of functioning. Compared to the CUD− group, the CUD+ group had a higher proportion of men and a higher proportion of patients with a history of psychosis. CUD+ subjects demonstrated significantly better performance on measures of attention, processing speed, and working memory. The history of CUD is associated with history of psychosis, suggestive of poorer clinical prognosis. Interestingly, bipolar patients with history of CUD had
better
neurocognitive performance as compared to patients with no history of CUD.
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  • 11 months later...

It certainly does work for bi-polar issues... the only thing that has brought me out of terribly dark periods in my life.  Sure, medications are available and they work (when us "bi-polars" are taking them) but there's a whole slew of side effects, unknown substances and high costs associated with those.  While I'm on meds, I prefer to go the natural way

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  • 11 months later...

The use of medical marijuana is actually beneficial to both patients who suffer from bipolar disorder and middle-aged men. In addition, there seem to be no permanent psychological consequences of frequent marijuana use with middle-aged men.

I agree. But I wanted to add that this only works if you can keep them away from alcohol. Alcohol use (in the extreme) totally negates any beneficial behavioral effects of cannabis. Cannabis use does seem to help get alcoholics on the wagon. But it takes a lot to keep them their. As soon as their stash runs out they revert back to alcohol. It's a viscous circle for poor folks.
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  • 11 months later...

I'm not sure if I've posted in this thread prior as it's old and I'm not going back to re read :)

 

I was dx'd bi polar while in my teens and have taken a plethora of pharmaceuticals over the years.

Some provided limited relief while with others I suffered horrendous side effects.  One cocktail I

was prescribed led me to gain 80lbs in one year, which in turn effected my health negatively

and this particular mix of drugs did nothing to relieve my condition.  I am still struggling to loose

much of this excess weight.

 

I began what the industry calls 'self medicating' at the age of 15 by the age of 17 I consumed

cannabis as often as possible, and do so to this day.  The worst side effects I encountered from

cannabis use are the munchies (lol) and oh my... I could sleep at night (major improvement for an insomniac).

 

Alcohol however became the way for me to escape, how I 'self medicated' in earnest until about the age

of 32.  Dam near unintentionally killed myself more times than I can remember and put myself into extremely

dangerous situations time after time due to alcohol consumption.  Baaad stuff, booze.

 

I turned to the booze because it was easily available unlike cannabis back then.  There were droughts

when I just wasn't able to get cannabis... so, I drank instead.

 

Times have changed, I am a patient and cannabis is much more accessible and consistently so.

I no longer use alcohol with any regularity, nor do I even crave it.

 

I weaned myself off the handful of 'head meds' I took daily and have been 'clean' for over 1 1/2 years now.

My physical and mental health have only improved since.

I accredit my over all good health to the consistent availability and my regular consumption of cannabis.

 

I believe it is as simple as providing my endocannabinoid system with sufficient cannabinoids, resulting

in better health over all.

Yep, feed your head just as Gracie Slick suggested.

 

I will never buy into the pharma lies again. I am living proof that cannabis treats bi polar with success.

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  • 2 months later...

 

175]Cannabis use linked to cognitive performance in bipolar patients

175]By Mark Cowen

175]20 July 2012

175]Psychiatry Res 2012; Advance online publication

175]

MedWire News: Results from a US study suggest that bipolar I disorder (BD I) patients with a history of cannabis use have better neurocognitive function than those who have not used cannabis.

The team found that BD I patients with cannabis use disorder (CUD) performed better on measures of attention, processing speed, and working memory than other BD I patients, despite being more likely to have a history of psychosis, indicating a more severe disease course.

"These data could be interpreted to suggest that cannabis use may have a beneficial effect on cognitive functioning in patients with severe psychiatric disorders," comment Raphael Braga (The Zucker Hillside Hospital, Glen Oaks, New York) and team.

"However, it is also possible that these findings may be due to the requirement for a certain level of cognitive function and related social skills in the acquisition of illicit drugs."

The results come from a study of 200 BD I patients, of whom 50 had CUD.

All of the participants underwent clinical assessments and completed a neurocognitive test battery.

There were no significant differences between patients with and without CUD regarding age, racial background, or highest education level achieved, the researchers note in Psychiatry Research.

However, patients with CUD were more likely to have a history of psychosis than those without, at 82.0% versus 67.3%.

Nevertheless, patients with CUD had significantly better attention, processing speed/set-shifting, and working memory than those without, as indicated by scores on the Digits forward test (7.00 vs 6.25), the Trails B test (93.32 vs 120.77 seconds), and the Digits Backward test (4.93 vs 4.23), respectively.

Braga and team conclude: "These analyses indicate an interesting pattern suggesting superior neurocognitive performance among bipolar patients with comorbid CUD when compared to bipolar patients without a history of cannabis use.

"Moreover, this cognitive advantage is noted in spite of evidence of a more severe clinical course."

They add: "We hope that the results from our study will help guide and encourage future large studies and help further elucidate the multifaceted associations and possible impact of cannabis use in bipolar disorder."

MedWire (www.medwire-news.md) is an independent clinical news service provided by Springer Healthcare Limited. © Springer Healthcare Ltd; 2012

Free abstract

 

 

and

 

 

 

Abstract

 

Studies investigating the impact of cannabis use on bipolar clinical characteristics and neurocognition are limited. The objective of the present study was to compare clinical and neurocognitive measures in individuals with bipolar disorder with a history of cannabis use disorder (CUD) versus those without a history of CUD. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a large cohort (N=200) of bipolar I subjects, either with (CUD+; N=50) or without (CUD−; N=150) a history of CUD. We compared the groups on clinical and demographic variables, as well as on performance on neurocognitive tests. Patient groups did not differ regarding age, age of onset or global assessment of functioning. Compared to the CUD− group, the CUD+ group had a higher proportion of men and a higher proportion of patients with a history of psychosis. CUD+ subjects demonstrated significantly better performance on measures of attention, processing speed, and working memory. The history of CUD is associated with history of psychosis, suggestive of poorer clinical prognosis. Interestingly, bipolar patients with history of CUD had better neurocognitive performance as compared to patients with no history of CUD.

 

Happy to see that you are still around helping others as you always have.  Love you brother.

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I'm not sure if I've posted in this thread prior as it's old and I'm not going back to re read :)

 

I was dx'd bi polar while in my teens and have taken a plethora of pharmaceuticals over the years.

Some provided limited relief while with others I suffered horrendous side effects.  One cocktail I

was prescribed led me to gain 80lbs in one year, which in turn effected my health negatively

and this particular mix of drugs did nothing to relieve my condition.  I am still struggling to loose

much of this excess weight.

 

I began what the industry calls 'self medicating' at the age of 15 by the age of 17 I consumed

cannabis as often as possible, and do so to this day.  The worst side effects I encountered from

cannabis use are the munchies (lol) and oh my... I could sleep at night (major improvement for an insomniac).

 

Alcohol however became the way for me to escape, how I 'self medicated' in earnest until about the age

of 32.  Dam near unintentionally killed myself more times than I can remember and put myself into extremely

dangerous situations time after time due to alcohol consumption.  Baaad stuff, booze.

 

I turned to the booze because it was easily available unlike cannabis back then.  There were droughts

when I just wasn't able to get cannabis... so, I drank instead.

 

Times have changed, I am a patient and cannabis is much more accessible and consistently so.

I no longer use alcohol with any regularity, nor do I even crave it.

 

I weaned myself off the handful of 'head meds' I took daily and have been 'clean' for over 1 1/2 years now.

My physical and mental health have only improved since.

I accredit my over all good health to the consistent availability and my regular consumption of cannabis.

 

I believe it is as simple as providing my endocannabinoid system with sufficient cannabinoids, resulting

in better health over all.

Yep, feed your head just as Gracie Slick suggested.

 

I will never buy into the pharma lies again. I am living proof that cannabis treats bi polar with success.

 

imiubu, good to see that you are still here as well, it's been a long time.  Thank you for your story, I can totally relate to your story, alcohol I did use.  Haven't had a drink since Feb, 1976.  Cannabis is my meds of choice, big pharma kills.

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imiubu, good to see that you are still here as well, it's been a long time.  Thank you for your story, I can totally relate to your story, alcohol I did use.  Haven't had a drink since Feb, 1976.  Cannabis is my meds of choice, big pharma kills.

 

Herb! Good to see you :)

So happy to hear you were able to stop the alcohol.

I have 2 younger brothers who are fully ensnared in

it's wicked talons and it is so sad and frustrating to not

be able to help them.They still view cannabis as 'recreational'

and not as medicine.  I however will not stop sharing the message

of health and well being.

Maybe one day they will hear and heal themselves.

 

 

Be well brother Herb.

Edited by imiubu
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considering the only treatments for "bi polar" disorder has been frontal lobotomy, electric shock therapy, straight jackets/segregation, prison and now experimental psychotropic drugs of a class we've never seen before this new era. The same drugs that can make kids stop biting their nails, or adults to quit smoking are now used to elevate the sexual desires of women in a Viagra type life style drug.  I believe it is waaaaay to early to rule out ANY drugs' efficacy, especially one that has grown forever, never killed anyone, and is widely available in most areas.

the side effects of this strange class of drugs are well known and documented. I do not know of a school shooting in our country that was not committed by a person, often a child, who was prescribed these experimental psychotropic drugs, once mandated for adult use only with a suicide warning label.

 

The base of these drugs is found in fluoride, a toxin to the human organ by anyone standards. The pineal gland damage has been known since world wars.The fact that many cities force feed this (now/then) medicine to be consumed by all, swallowed.... not as a tooth rinse, with no regard to "patient" weight/age or need......seems like forced medication to me, a scary thought in our century maybe.  What happens to the child who drinks 8 glasses of water and takes additional fluoride based prescriptions?  does he shoot other people suddenly? are these drugs over used in schools today?  If they cannot live without them does that make them addicted?

 

Cannabis has helped long lists of maladies during human history including the use for spiritual, physical and mental stability. Its most likely an essential nutrient to our organ.  At one time many commercial pharmaceuticals were cannabis based. I wonder why cannabis medicine is freely prescribed to other countries for their relief. Does our country wish us to be at dis-ease ?

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I find great relief from BP symptoms with Paxil, which is a front line antidepressant drug for this purpose, use Valium to control the rare instances of mania, and have now for the past few years. Bad outcomes have happened when I've been off them. I did stop taking them from time to time because the Paxil left me feeling just vacant and without emotion. I've since lowered the dosage of that drug half and using it regularly, but only a third as often, and am finding it much more appropriate. Without it cannabis does not control the symptoms well. My Valium use has all but ceased. I am confident that is because many stressors I had for a long time are now gone, and the Paxil does very well almost by itself. Other experiences notwithstanding, it can be said that cannabis is great to use as an adjunct for me, but not as a sole tx. There can be no argument that it does not play in mood, and for the better. For that matter, it is just plain great just because and for anyone, anywhere, anytime.

 

Bipolar Disorder is indeed a real condition with physiological underpinnings, and it is considered that they are many. I have come to believe that neurotransmission is somehow poorly regulated, resulting in severe depression or exultant mania. I believe extremes of serotonin and dopamine play a big part, and there may be others that affect the condition. Whereas they up regulate their channels, sending electrochemical current one way between synapses, cannabinoids have been found to down regulate impulses in the other direction. That's the short version. I've found those themes in the literature, and do keep up with it as best I can.

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  • 6 years later...
59 minutes ago, Dr. Roman Filipowicz said:
There is small scientific evidence to support the efficacy of cannabis to treat bipolar disorder, some studies conclude the substance may, in fact, worsen symptoms.

What I have seen personally is that a bi polar person can substitute in cannabis for opioids and/or alcohol. When they do that there is much better control over the disease. However, what often happens is the patient reverts back to the old bad habits in conjunction with cannabis which can seem like cannabis has made things worse. 

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