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Outdoor Design, Top Covering


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So on a big structure -- 30' greenhouses or bigger, what are people using as a secure top covering? The kit I ordered comes with fabric top not like plastic you can poke a finger through. I'm thinking of adding 6' wide chicken wire between the rafter sections, or even feedlot heavy welded wire fence. Around this WHOLE thing will be a 8' tall treated wood fence.

 

You WILL have to use tools to get in. Be it a ladder, sawzall, drill -- but by that point my geese will be honking and the dog will be running.

 

I really need some help here because it's my last hurdle. If I need a secure structure, somehow I need to secure the top with more than the fabric covering.

 

 

Should I just go right to the Prosecutor and ask him for a letter stating the plans I set forth, 8' fence, 35x96 fabric building, wooden end walls and steel fencing down the sides, fabric covering on top not able to be penetrated without a knife or tool is deemed sufficient within our County? Sheriff? State Police?

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Well first i would not talk to any prosecutor about growing cannabis and #2 i would not tell anyone you grow cannabis i know of someone that had ask the county Sheriff and all in his county and they all gave him the OK to grow and then came back a few days later with the DEA and raided him he and the rest of his family are in jail/prison today

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 8' fence, 35x96 fabric building, wooden end walls and steel fencing down the sides, fabric covering on top

the 2 years i ran greenhouse 48 x 21, my only raiders were local teenagers trying to steal my plants.  helicopters and planes flew but never bothered with me.  they were fooled by the geese and chickens covering the surrounding yard.  the 2nd year i added chicken wire to support the bladders that rain formed in the plastic.  anything porus is better than plastic and chicken wire is nearly impenetrable when serving as a support for plaswtic.  best advicse---see Big Sluggers Greenhouse 2012...but make your place look like a bird farm.

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http://www.legislature.mi.gov/documents/2011-2012/publicact/pdf/2012-PA-0512.pdf

 

2
EHB 4851
(d) “Enclosed, locked facility” means a closet, room, or other comparable, stationary, and fully enclosed area equipped
with secured locks or other functioning security devices that permit access only by a registered primary caregiver or
registered qualifying patient. Marihuana plants grown outdoors are considered to be in an enclosed, locked facility if
they are not visible to the unaided eye from an adjacent property when viewed by an individual at ground level or from
a permanent structure and are grown within a stationary structure that is enclosed on all sides, except for the base, by
chain-link fencing, wooden slats, or a similar material that prevents access by the general public and that is anchored,
attached, or affixed to the ground; located on land that is owned, leased, or rented by either the registered qualifying
patient or a person designated through the departmental registration process as the primary caregiver for the registered
qualifying patient or patients for whom the marihuana plants are grown; and equipped with functioning locks or other
security devices that restrict access to only the registered qualifying patient or the registered primary caregiver who
owns, leases, or rents the property on which the structure is located. Enclosed, locked facility includes a motor vehicle
if both of the following conditions are met:
 
 
does your outdoor grow space solution meet the definition presented above?
 
arguably yes.
 
do not ask LEO.. even if they answer in writing.... it could change the next day without warning.
 
be as compliant as you are willing to argue.
 
is your location cannabis friendly as a whole? 
 
do your neighbors have issues with you or your occupation that your aware of?
 
do you know your outdoor facility will stand up under close legal scrutiny if you are called to do so?
 
i would not grow outdoors in my own neighborhood... it would be difficult at best to argue my position and i am not going to proceed with a project if i cannot feel confident in my position.
 
bottom line.. your proposed solution could work in certain areas... but i would exorcise extreme caution when growing an [improperly] scheduled 1 narcotic outdoors.
Edited by mibrains
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Neighbors are all farmers, I bought land strictly to farm on.

 

I know the law, and I know the casual passerby or teenager is going to have to work to get in. It's a 35 foot x 96 foot greenhouse. Not a small backyard thing, in the middle of the U.P. Farm country.

 

With 8' fence and locking gate around the already locked and enclosed greenhouse. The house itself will be 100% 4 sided cover with steel welded fence or treated plywood walls on the end. The house sidewalks are 6' but the top of the structure is a visibility blocking greenhouse fabric (not plastic) and needs a knife to get through.

 

I'm also going to be fRming the other 8 acres legitimately (apples, cabbage, things I can easily get rid of in deer season).

 

There's no house there but a neighbor is going to help keep watch and I'm going to park a camper for Sept-November night watch.

 

Middle of farm country with a few nursuries and farms with other greenhouses in the area.

 

My real only concern is whether the opAque greenhouse fabric (88% light transfer, but you cNt see anything except shadows through it) will suffice for the similar material definition for all sides. It's obviously unrealistic to expect me to build this like a. Dog kennel. I know of big slugger and have taken many ideas from him, but I'm watching the Colorado guys closer and most of them use Farmtek kits.

 

Thanks for helping keep my brain workin, guys

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Well my order is in and I get to go pick it up in about 8 days. I'm going with the fabric over the top and calling it a day. Other guys are running plastic houses and even a few no-top grows up here. I don't see any feasible way a person is going to casually break in without tools (ladder and knife are needed, at least).

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chain link fence is probably best but requires a bit more structural reinforcement.

like a construction crew with cement and forms and stretchers and bob cat!  that is why i used chicken wire---it does the job so easily and inexpensively!  amateurs can use the tools at hand and their own labor.  chain link is more than raw beginners can handle, and way more $ than a non-commercial grower can justify. the same is true of rolls of welded wire, handling them is near to handling chain link.  if your covering material is stiff enuf you won't develop bladders and won't need any support underneath, such as chicken wire...now if you go all-season, the snow weight will demand a substantial structural underpinning.

Edited by pic book
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The kit calls for 8 or 12" augered holes filled with concrete to frost line (48" in the U.P.). Got a tractor with a 12" auger on call and he's coming June 1st to drill my holes. I pick my kit up on the 30th/31st (had to plan for kids to be gone, work off, etc. etc. etc.).

 

I'm going with just 5/4" 8' treated deck boards for the fence around the structure. 10' 4x4 posts set 3' down in concrete, I'll run them all with the 8" auger bit and will leave a 1/2" gap between boards to move "some" air through, or grab a few hundred extra and do a shadow box type fence (easier to climb though, I think). 8' spacing off the edges of the house and 16' on one end so I can get a skid steer / tractor / transport in there.

 

I don't wanna work with chainlink and I'm into this for some bucks already so getting the chainlink contractor out isn't cheap or cost effective in my eyes. I have the ability to dig holes and pour bag cement and bust my donkey to get this done, so that's what I'll do!

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https://www.google.com/search?q=pressure+treated+lumber+off+gasses&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&channel=sb

 

http://www.allweatherwood.com/is-treated-wood-safe/

be happy to know that pressure treated lumber installed inside their homes is also safe. Pressure treated lumber poses no danger from leaching, chemical breakdown or off-gassing, when used in an interior use.

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More info and Tech Guidlines regarding specific uses etc. 

 

Am Wood Preservative Assoc.

 

"... our expertise is in wood durability, and NOT human health and safety.  We rely on the U.S. EPA to determine product safety during their registration process.  It is our understanding that the wood preservatives used in treated wood available to consumers have been registered by EPA for general use, which means that EPA has determined it is relatively safe for most, if not all, consumer applications.   Different people perceive safety in different ways.  If you're concerned, you could always apply some type of coating or sealer to reduce the amount of soil contact with the preservative treated wood, or perhaps even put a sheet of plastic between the treated wood and the soil if you want to minimize or eliminate contact between wood and soil. "               peace

 

... EPA,   Chromated Copper Arsenate:

 

"   Consumer Information:

This wood has been preserved by pressure-treatment with an EPA-registered pesticide containing inorganic arsenic to protect it from insect attack and decay. Wood treated with inorganic arsenic should be used only where such protection is important.

Inorganic arsenic penetrates deeply into and remains in the pressure-treated wood for a long time. However, some chemical may migrate from treated wood into surrounding soil over time and may also be dislodged from the wood surface upon contact with skin. Exposure to inorganic arsenic may present certain hazards. Therefore, the following precautions should be taken both when handling the treated wood and in determining where to use or dispose of the treated wood."

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Everyone I have ever heard of asking any kind of law enforcemnt about growing had the feds called on them or was harrassed just keep yo mouth shut. As far a treated lumber leaching. It is a factor. I grow a small scale organic hops yard and we use black locust poles instead of tradiditonal telephone/power poles because they will leach chemicals into the ground. The organic inspector that comes every year to certify the organicness will not sign off unless you are using untreated poles. This also goes for painted bamboo sticks. The paint will leach off the bamboo and into the plants, and who knows whats in that paint they used in china.

Edited by resinxtractor
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So on a big structure -- 30' greenhouses or bigger, what are people using as a secure top covering? The kit I ordered comes with fabric top not like plastic you can poke a finger through. I'm thinking of adding 6' wide chicken wire between the rafter sections, or even feedlot heavy welded wire fence. Around this WHOLE thing will be a 8' tall treated wood fence.

 

You WILL have to use tools to get in. Be it a ladder, sawzall, drill -- but by that point my geese will be honking and the dog will be running.

 

I really need some help here because it's my last hurdle. If I need a secure structure, somehow I need to secure the top with more than the fabric covering.

 

 

Should I just go right to the Prosecutor and ask him for a letter stating the plans I set forth, 8' fence, 35x96 fabric building, wooden end walls and steel fencing down the sides, fabric covering on top not able to be penetrated without a knife or tool is deemed sufficient within our County? Sheriff? State Police?

All three and make sure they have your pic and addy in favorites.

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I used pig fencing on my roof and walls, because chicken wire didn't seem like a big enough effort on my part to prevent the theft of our most evil growing weed. our fabric covering is a good choice.  its available at farm and fleet, tractor supply types , they can fold a huge section in half for a pick up truck, and they cost around 20 bucks a section, around 12 x 4 feet.

 

if nobody knows, than nobody will know anyways. cops come when you get noticed, so don't get noticed for best results.

 

edit to add- plants should be outside by now flowering. whats the status?

So on a big structure -- 30' greenhouses or bigger, what are people using as a secure top covering? The kit I ordered comes with fabric top not like plastic you can poke a finger through. I'm thinking of adding 6' wide chicken wire between the rafter sections, or even feedlot heavy welded wire fence. Around this WHOLE thing will be a 8' tall treated wood fence.

 

You WILL have to use tools to get in. Be it a ladder, sawzall, drill -- but by that point my geese will be honking and the dog will be running.

 

I really need some help here because it's my last hurdle. If I need a secure structure, somehow I need to secure the top with more than the fabric covering.

 

 

Should I just go right to the Prosecutor and ask him for a letter stating the plans I set forth, 8' fence, 35x96 fabric building, wooden end walls and steel fencing down the sides, fabric covering on top not able to be penetrated without a knife or tool is deemed sufficient within our County? Sheriff? State Police?

Edited by grassmatch
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Hog panels are pretty hard to work with - they flex to much. Ive found cutting them in half saves on the swearing.

 

When we built our greenhouse several years ago for vegtable growing we just used old windows we got for free. Their are plenty of plans on the net for recycled inexpensive greenhouses. We had done a couple of the plastic sheeting greenhouses in the past. We found that they were not very strudy and the weather played havoc on them more than once. The greenhouse we eventually built is 12 x 24 and cost under $1,500 of which $600 was on the double walled polycarbonate for the roof . Eveything else was recycled windows off CL it is secure on all sides and we don't have to replace the plastic sheeting every few years. Oh the foundation is made out of cinder blocks - again free off CL

 

When we built the greenhouse never did I imagine I would be growing pot for my husband - it just worked out as a big bonus. We could never afford the cost of an indoor grow or to buy meds for him. So far the plants are doing great - they are right next to my tomatoes :D  I for one am thankful that the state is allowing outdoor grows! :)

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Buildings almost up, another day or two on the man lift and a day on the ground. It's a woven poly fabric like deer apple bags or corn. See through but tough as bunny muffin, hail sticks rocks etc won't pierce it.

 

I'll get you guys some pictures the next time I'm at work. 2 dozen 3 footers are ready to go, plus 2 dozen more seeds and clones started in late May. I'm good, and not late.

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