Jump to content

Thank You Fellow Veterens For Your Life.


mibrains
 Share

Recommended Posts

http://blog.theveteranssite.com/memorial-day2015-tribute/?utm_source=social&utm_medium=vetfan&utm_campaign=memorial-day2015-tribute&utm_term=20150521

posted

3 days ago

By Dan Doyle

I’ve Never Thought About Memorial Day Like This…

The fact is that most people will not attend Memorial Day events this holiday weekend. Indeed, most Americans have little knowledge of, or connection to the Memorial day events. This is the first long weekend of the summer and most will be thinking of anything but Memorial Day. It is a reality that those who have served this country in uniform, and their families, are less that 1% of the American population. Most people today, even though we have been at war for the last 14 years, do not even know anyone who is serving, or who has served in our military. Most would not be able to tell you why we celebrate Memorial Day.

This coming weekend our cities will be decorated in bunting and the American flag will be flying along downtown streets all across America. There will be memorial ceremonies held at National Cemeteries, and small local cemeteries, where veterans are buried beneath broad, manicured grounds marked with long, regimented rows of white marker stones.

Some people will gather in those places of rest around the country to remember their own family members who died in service. Others will come to honor all who have served the nation in times of war and times of peace. The flag will be raised solemnly as the National Anthem is played or sung. The plangent, melancholy notes of “Taps” will waft over the silent grounds.   The old veterans in attendance will be recognized by their baseball hats emblazoned with military branch insignias, or with the names of the wars they were in. They will stand at awkward attention and salute at the raising of the flag, or during the playing of “Taps.” Their eyes and cheeks may be moist with tears, because they will be remembering fallen brothers and sisters in ways most can not imagine.

 

It is not wars that we are remembering with this national holiday. Rather, we are remembering those who served and those who gave their last full measure of devotion in order to insure that the freedoms that this country offers to all would be able to be passed on to the next generations. We remember them because they tell us something of our human dignity. They remind us of the cost of freedom and of the quality of our character as a nation. We do not gather on this holiday to glorify wars. Rather, we are challenged to remember that when war comes unbidden to us, there are those who are willing to give their all to defend this nation. Deep down we want to remember in the hope that we will find ways to prevent wars and never again have to fight them again. There is, among veterans, no more hoped for desire than the desire that their own sons and daughters will never have to suffer the terrors of war, or the effects of war.


Why, then, should we all remember?

 



all veterans hope and pray that their war will be the last war.

History

Memorial Day remembrances go back to the Civil War. They were originally called “Decoration Day” and were created out of a desire to honor those who had fallen. It was officially proclaimed on the 5th of May, 1868 by General John Logan, the then commander of the Army of the Republic, in his General Order No. 11. It read: “The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land.”  That particular date, May 30, was chosen because it wasn’t the anniversary of any particular battle.

In December of 2000 a resolution was passed in Congress calling on all Americans to observe a National Moment of Remembrance at 3:00 p.m. local time. We are asked “to voluntarily and informally observe in our own ways a moment of remembrance and respect, pausing from whatever [we] are doing for a moment of silence or listening to the playing of ‘Taps.'”

Memorial-Tribute-alt-546x314.jpg

We here at The Veterans Site encourage all to attend your local Memorial Day events. If you are unable to do so, we encourage you to observe the “Moment of Remembrance” this Memorial Day by yourselves, or with those you might be with at that time. Share this post on Facebook to encourage your friends and families as well. It would be a great way to teach the young of the importance of remembering those who have sacrificed so much in service to this county. It is their sacrifices that have protected and defended all of the freedoms and privileges we enjoy as American citizens.

Why should we remember?

We should remember because a nation that cannot, or that will not, remember its past will suffer a far more perilous future.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The veterans are thanked on Veterans day.  Memorial Day is for those that fell in battle.

 

:-)

 

We have a nice flag ceremony in my little town for this at the cemetery. The town next over has a very nice ceremony on top of the mountain by the ski hill(iron mountain). Nice stuff.  There are memorial bike runs that day as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

correct mal..

 

thats why i posted this story and my title says "for giving your life"

 

it is so very important that all of us take a couple of moments this weekend... well actually Monday at 1500 (3 PM Post meridian) to take a few moments and thank those Americans who have fallen during the course of their service.

 

i am proud to have served my country and put my life on the line.

 

i am happy i did not have to cash that particular check.

 

thank you each and every soul who gave all of themselves to protect our great country.

 

God bless you all and peace be within your souls.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

    You will need new recruits to fix this government and they will have their hands full, because, this holiday is Memorial Day. It is  for Veterans who have had their lives taken allready in the commision of  defending this Country. Not necessarily its  government.  I'm still upset that my DD214 {hon. discharge paper} was signed by the treacherous, double-dealing RMNixon. An omen of sorts, of what was in store for US in the following years 1973-...

 

     Hope things go better for the newer Veterans.  However on this day I am most gratefull for all the American Heroes esp those who died in combat trying to make this a better place .

And the rest of the bums that have DRUG US down, shame on you...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK so, did yours come in a green plastic book-like folder? Maybe it was the paper on the other side, some kind of an acknowledgement letter, that it was on.   I am not currentley  in possesion of this item, but I can assure you that signature was in the book. I took it as a really bad joke.  

 

Just checked my DD214. My ETS date was August 11, 1971. Mine was signed by CW4 Hite, Asst Adj Gen, Fort Lee, Va.


I never realized Nixon signed anyone's DD214.

Thanks for your service ... and the memories. 

Edited by solabeirtan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

40%-60% of our economy only supports one percent of our population. then hangs them out to dry with cancer from agent orange or ptsd. I do not support murder. Last nite I saw a soldier bragging on the news that they have killed over 10,000 people in the middle east with drones. Gas is still 3$ a gallon. DONT SUPPORT THE 1%ers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

are government leaders responsible for our "great country", or maybe just the "great country" ideal we often speak of?

leaders have driven our great country into the ground imo. we have hungry people in many cities begging for food.

Our children go missing most hours of every day. Our prisons are stuffed with non violent offenders and mentally ill citizens.

The same guns are used in crimes over and over. Heroin importation is at its all time high. thank's to our Great Country, and those that make it's policies I guess.

my son tells me about the "Front Line Pharmacy" in service. When a man cries out he cannot bomb that building sir! there are innocents in there for example, he's sent to the front line pharmacist, who hands out Zoloft and Prozac, to get the job done, for our great country. We finally got that pesky poppy field surrounded, whew....now lets keep the water coming...heeve, hoe, heeve, hoe....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't wait for Veterans' day to thank a vet.  I took my kids to DC in April.  We walked all over the city and saw only one guy who appeared to be a vet.  (I was surprised that we didn't see more, especially at the WWII memorial.  I figured the place would be crawling with vets.)  He was about 80ish and was wearing a ball cap with military insignias on it, and he was just resting on a park bench somewhere between the Washington Monument and the Vietnam Wall.  I sat beside him and pointed to my teenage kids (who were playing with the squirrels - innocence at its best) and thanked him and told him that it was men like him who made it so I could take my beautiful kids to such a beautiful city and celebrate our freedom (or what's left of it, heh).  He nodded, and smiled in a crooked and sad but happy sort of way, shook my hand and said, "take care of those beautiful kids."  I said, "you gave me a great start."  With that, we parted company. 

 

My dad's dad fought in the trenches in WWI for the Brits.  My mom's dad fought in WWII with the USAF.  We are just about out of WWI vets now.  WWII vets will all be gone soon too.  So, please, take just a few seconds out of your day to thank those who fought for our freedom.  It means a lot to the vets. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't wait for Veterans' day to thank a vet.  I took my kids to DC in April.  We walked all over the city and saw only one guy who appeared to be a vet.  (I was surprised that we didn't see more, especially at the WWII memorial.  I figured the place would be crawling with vets.)  He was about 80ish and was wearing a ball cap with military insignias on it, and he was just resting on a park bench somewhere between the Washington Monument and the Vietnam Wall.  I sat beside him and pointed to my teenage kids (who were playing with the squirrels - innocence at its best) and thanked him and told him that it was men like him who made it so I could take my beautiful kids to such a beautiful city and celebrate our freedom (or what's left of it, heh).  He nodded, and smiled in a crooked and sad but happy sort of way, shook my hand and said, "take care of those beautiful kids."  I said, "you gave me a great start."  With that, we parted company. 

 

My dad's dad fought in the trenches in WWI for the Brits.  My mom's dad fought in WWII with the USAF.  We are just about out of WWI vets now.  WWII vets will all be gone soon too.  So, please, take just a few seconds out of your day to thank those who fought for our freedom.  It means a lot to the vets. 

 

A few years back, wife and I went to D.C. in April. I always wear something that shows military when I visit. Well, I was only person all day that had anything military on display. I was bummed.

 

We have been to D.C. for 15 years, always on Memorial Day or Veteran's Day. This is when all the veterans show up.

 

So now, only time I will visit is Memorial Day or Veteran's Day. Get to see my brothers and sisters.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...